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states an authorization to use military force, a declaration of war or any similar authority shall not authorize the detention without charge or trial of a citizen or lawful permanent resident of the united states apprehended in the united states unless an act of congress expressly authorizes such detention. that affirms the second circuit's clear statement rule from the padilla case. now, some may ask why this amendment protects green card holders as well as citizens and others may ask why the amendment does not protect all persons apprehended in the united states from indefinite detention. let me make clear i would support providing the protections in this amendment to all persons in the united states, whether lawfully or unlawfully present, but the question is is there enough support in this body to expand this amendment to cover others besides united states citizens and green card holders? i do not believe there is. we got 45 votes last year. we have gained support this year. and so my hope is that at least we can clear the law with a clear statement on citizens and legal resid
in a way that human and dogs have used for centuries -- >> so we've had a lot of discussion about whether it's 5 minutes or 15 minutes or whether it's mothballs, i understood the issue to be with us under the fourth amendment whether or not it is a search for the dog to come up to the door and sniff. we're not making a judgment on the probable cause, but the ground of the decision below was this is a search when the dog sniffs. >> you need probable cause just for the dog to sniff. no, that's a absolutely right. and the dog's sniff itself clearly is not a physical invasion in the same way that looking is not a physical invasion under the common law -- >> it isn't the sniffing in the abstract, it's the sniffing at this point. the sniffing at a person's front door, right? >> well, i mean, that's true, your honor, but i think if it wasn't a search for the police officer to walk up there and sniff and report smelling live marijuana, then it wasn't a search when frankie walked up there and alerted to the presence of an illegal narcotic. >> well, i didn't say it wouldn't be a search if the polic
core standards were implemented in the new assessment tools were used. math scores took a huge hit as well. with a percent of students earning proficient scores plunging from 73% to 40%. kentucky is an early warning indicator for the rest of the nation, as other states implement common core. so we have a challenge. the challenge will be should we just ignore the facts that our children are not truly college and/or career ready? should we accept the fact where moving to second class status? or will we have the courage to stay the course, to faithfully implement higher standards, to assess them accurately, and recognize the fact that too many of our children are lagging behind? the initial reaction will be, and it's already started, in florida is begun in other places as well, kill the messenger. blame it on the tests. blame it on somebody. blame it on the former governor. there's all sorts of people that you can blame this stuff on, but the simple fact is if we are going to restore american greatness, which we all want, whether we are liberals or conservatives, we have to start with
that he's doing now so when some of us suggested the misreading of the mandate he did it for years ago. he threw away the approval rating to spend the stimulus package written on all this other stuff, massive debt and spending and you had a million people go to the streets around august, april 15th. he had only just showed up and started spending crazily. tarp ii me and you then have a reaction from the movement that reacted in 2010. people lost the elections over spending too much. okay. the first by half to get whacked was arlen specter of pennsylvania. i was working with him to get in the elected and on the labour union demand not wanting to have elections to have power. he was going to fend off the right of center primary and be able to govern and get reelected and then obama said if you vote for the stimulus instead of philadelphia and we can probably do some things to be helpful in pennsylvania and he said i just want a free election. when the primary. i'm going to sign on the stimulus. obama is going to stay out of get out the vote against me and people will be happy i brought someb
together, you know, are going to bankrupt us in the future. and, you know, medicare, it's all health care. if we don't solve that problem, we've got a problem whether it's the government spending or private spending. so we've got health care cost inflation as the number one problem. the aging is really not that big of a problem. with social security we saved money in the trust fund to get us past most of the peak boomer retirement years. life expectancy growth is so moderate as a factor compared to other things that once the baby boomers retire, costs as a share of g, the p -- gdp level off. there is a little growth in life expectancy, but it's very minor. if there's a demographic problem, it's the dropoff in births, not, you know, in population growth which has to do with immigration and the birthrate and not with life expectancy. and for the record, i'm in favor of gradually increasing the payroll tax to offset increases in life expectancy because it would be so slow and so modest that it wouldn't be much of a tax increase, and it would sort of shut people up altogether. but usually, of
injuring himself into a program at walter reed what it ended up using acupuncture, using meditation, using other techniques to wean him off of all the drugs that he was on, and through this program he actually was able to walk out of walter reed on his own two feet. so, you know, i really commend the military for two things, for one, for allowing us to tell this story, both good and bad, but for recognizing this problem by recognizing that there is this problem of overmedication and that they are looking for outside the box ideas and how to fix it. i mean, that's sort of the whole thesis of the film really, the metaphor of "escape fire" is the status quo isn't working and we need to start looking for outside the box ideas. >> more with matthew heineman, producer and director of "escape fire," the fight to rescue america's health care. sunday night at eight on c-span's q&a. >> live picture from the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c., a discussion just getting underway with political analysts and pollsters taking a look at the election numbers and examining a voter turnout and
will work today on a measure to normalize u.s. trade relations with russia. you can see that debate starting at noon eastern over on c-span. now live to the senate floor here on c-span2. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the chaplain, dr. barry black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. eternal lord god, today let your favor rest upon the members of our government's legislative branch. establish the works of their hands and strengthen them to honor you by serving others. let your life-giving spirit move them to feel greater compassion for those in need. use them to remove barriers that divide us, may they strive to be agents of healing and hope, as they help us all live in greater justice and peace. we pray in your holy name. amen. the presiding officer: please join me in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication
is a 21st century poll tax. and those of us in the south who have a history where poll taxes were used to restrict voters, what you, in effect, have by having these extensive lines, if you are -- work on an hourly basis or can only get off a bit of time and -- you can't afford to wait three and four and five hours in line to vote. this legislation, the fair, accurate, secure and timely voting act of 2012, the so-called fast act, creates a competitive grant program to encourage states to aggressively pursue election reforms. it would provide incentives for states like virginia to invest in practices and technology designed to expedite voting at the polls and simplify voter registration. the fast voting act addresses this issue in a responsible way. it doesn't add new mandates. it authorizes simply additional resources for those states which start up -- step up with commonsense reforms to make voting faster and more accessible to voters. this is a relatively very small program but a few dollars spent to both increase the process, increase the number of voting machines at those polling pl
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8